With Asparagus, Green Onions, and Tomatoes Ingredients: Boneless, Skinless Chicken Breasts, approx. 2 lbs. (three breasts usually) Center Cut Pork Chops Tomatoes—Beefsteak or Brandywines Stalk of Green Onions Asparagus Butter Olive Oil Minced Garlic Spices: Herbs de Provence or Italian Spice Blend Rosemary Garlic Powder Oregano Basil Salt Pepper Process: After preparing the coals/pellets/gas, cover…

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Brisket is a cut of meat from the breast or lower chest of beef or veal, though in the United States, it is usually from adult cattle.  It is a favorite cut of beef for smoking (just ask anyone from Texas), though any kind of slow cooking method is necessary because of the nature of…

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For some folks, arguing about the preferred meat in chicken recipes—essentially white meat or dark meat—often resembles arguments over Apple and Microsoft products: intense, sometimes bitter, uncompromising.  For other folks, which sort of meat to have in a chicken recipe is usually a matter of whim or availability.  Although this recipe calls for dark mean…

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Created by Alfredo di Delio at his mother’s restaurant, Piazza Rosa, in Rome in 1907-8, his Alfredo Sauce was an immediate sensation.  His original recipe had only three ingredients—fettucine noodles, young Parmesan cheese, and butter—with the dish prepared tableside with an Italian chef’s flourish.  When the recipe reached American shores, it was amended to a…

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Vermicelli (meaning “little worms”) is a style of pasta in the same family as all types of spaghetti, the only significant difference in most commercial varieties is in the thickness of the noodle.  Few food staples have generated as much controversy as the origin of pasta; the legend that Marco Polo introduced pasta to the…

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Although it may seem to be another French dish, Steak Diane’s origin is actually Australian, first documented there in 1940, though, as is typical in the culinary world, there are a whole host of others who claim to have invented the dish.  Very quickly, however, it spread first to New York, then London, and Belgium,…

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Also known as beef bourguignon has been a documented staple of French cuisine for over two hundred years, though probably much longer undocumented.  The key to the recipe, of course, is getting the wine right; while burgundy wine is obviously the traditional choice, any hearty red wine will work just as well.  In fact, one…

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